play dating games for adults - How to solve radiometric dating problems

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Barrow and he has an interesting discussion on the speed of light in our geological past.On pages 186 and 187 he describes the discovery at Oklo in the West African Republic of Gabon, of the remnants of an ancient site where an accident of geology produced, for a while, the conditions suitable for a sustained chain reaction to take place - a sort of natural nuclear reactor.Setterfield: Atomic decay rates do not depend on the speed of light.

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It was moderated by water permeating a deposit of uranium.

As the reaction would proceed, the water would heat up and vaporize, thereby depriving the neutrons of the moderating influence of liquid water, and the reaction would slow down.

For a fuller discussion, refer to the original article.

It needs to be stressed that the RATE group recognises that there is physical evidence in the rocks that massive amounts of radioactive decay have occurred through the earth's history, and that there is a systematic trend in the radioisotopic 'ages' of the rocks in the geologic record from oldest at the bottom to youngest at the top.

In particular, because of the way mass and energy are related, they could not have been at variance from our present day observations by any more than one part in ten million; otherwise the natural reactor would not have functioned. I Shylakhter, Nature, 264, 340 (1976) and F Dyson and T Damour, "The Oklo Bound on the time variation of the fine-structure constant revisited", Nuclear Physics, B480 37 (1997) Any significant variation in the relationship between mass and energy - the only variables that determine the speed of light in Einstein's famous e = m c squared - would have to be dated prior to 1.8 billion years ago, based on this witness from God's creation. My reply on those pages was sparked by a question about Oklo and other ore bodies by Bob Gentry.

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